BETHEL — Lynne Salierno of Ridgefield and Dee Moro of Brookfield chatted while they worked on their latest needlepoint project — an ocean scene with shorebirds and shells — during a Friday morning class at A Stitch In Time.

“It’s good to do when watching kids hockey game or soccer games,” Moro said of the hobby. “It’s also a good stress reliever.”

The instructor, Mary Ellen Winnicki of Yonkers, N.Y., worked the fiber into a holiday scene project that will ultimately hang on a Christmas tree as an ornament.

Similar classes, workshops and other social gatherings take place throughout the week at the knitting and needlepoint store that recently relocated to 10 Stony Hill Road after nearly 16 years in downtown Bethel. Store owner Eva Donnelly said she moved because she felt the location off I-84 offered easier access for her customers.

“My old customers are coming and we’re getting new ones, too,” she said. “Some people call it the new yoga. It’s meditation. It also helps with arthritis; it keeps the fingers nimble.”

Weather plays an important role in the success of knitting shops and this warm, dry fall was not favorable. Donnelly rejoiced at Friday’s cold temperatures.

“We really need cold weather, like it is today,” she said. “People don’t want to knit a sweater when it’s 75 degrees.”

Donnelly, a Danbury resident, said the warm weather persisted into November and many crafters will be behind on making their holiday gifts and decorations.

The Internet has both harmed and helped A Stitch In Time, the owner said. Online yarn and fiber retailers have cut into her business and she is reluctantly considering offering some of her products for sale online. She prefers to see customers in person, she said, so she can offer suggestions on getting the right products.

However, websites such as Ravelry for knitting and crocheting, and NeedlepointNation have sparked interest in the hobbies among wide demographics.

“It’s a big community,” store employee Lisa Porat said of Ravelry. “It’s really changed how we find patterns and it’s brought in a lot of younger knitters. There are thousands of patterns online.”

Pattern books used to be a big seller at A Stitch In Time, but websites such as Ravelry have made them obsolete. When Donnelly moved the store to its new location, she gave away or donated her extensive stock of books.

“We had the best selections of books anywhere, but then overnight people stopped buying them,” she said.

A Stitch in Time specializes in offering hard-to-find and quality yarns and fibers, such as alpaca, cashmere and metalics. She also has a selection of Once Upon a Corgi luxury yarns, which are hand-dyed by Westport’s Gabby Gergler. The store also has canvases, needles, hooks, bags and other accessories for knitting and needlepoint.

Donnelly said shawls and extra large scarfs are hot items to make now. People are still making hats, mittens and sweaters, too.

“Most of our customers are (aged) 35 and up, but we are getting some younger girls, too,” she said. “There are also men that knit and needlepoint, as well. It’s for everybody — just not everybody admits it.”

A Stitch In Time may be reached at 203-748-1002.

The writer may be reached at cbosak@hearstmediact.com; 203-731-3338