BRIDGEPORT — Say what you will about Donald J. Trump — the ochreous presidential hopeful knows how to bring people together.

As The Donald held forth on “dishonest” media types, “lying” Republican nomination challengers and how his casino that never was would have kept Bridgeport out of economic doldrums, dozens of men, women and children gathered along State Street and Fairfield Avenue to protest his very presence in the city.

In stark contrast to the almost entirely white crowd that packed the Klein Auditorium in support of the erstwhile real estate mogul, the families and groups of friends that flew neon placards outside more closely represented the population of the city.

“We’re coming here because Trump’s ideas are crazy. I mean, who does he think he is?” said Brandy Fernandes, who waved a neon placard at State Street and Iranistan Avenue. “He’s just a disgusting, perverted, racist pig.”

Fernandes, who is still a few years shy of voting age, objected to Trump’s stances on immigration and treatment of certain religious minorities.

“He thinks that just because you’re black or Latino you’re some kind of killer or rapist, if you’re Muslim you’re a terrorist to him,” said Fernandes. “People come here for a better life, for job opportunities.”

Could she vote, Fernandes said she leaned more toward Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, a Democratic socialist vying for the Democratic nomination against former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

But Trump drew opponents from the other end of the political spectrum as well.

Joan Adam, a supporter of Ohio Gov. John Kasich, schlepped to Bridgeport from Bronxville, N.Y. to voice her objections.

“If I take the one thing that he says he’s got going for him, that’ he’s a successful businessman ... I would say, if you want your hair cut, go to a hairdresser. If you want your car fixed, go to a mechanic. If you want real estate, go to Donald Trump, and if you want a president, pick somebody who has governmental experience,” said Adam.

Maryfrances Metrick, another Kasich supported from Ridgefield, said that Trump was too negative for her liking.

“I’ve never protested before, but I didn’t feel I could stay silent with a man like that,” said Metrick.

Despite their fervor, the protesters remained mostly peaceful, heeding instructions from mounted and walking police officers, though there were megaphone chants of “F—- Trump.”