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Monday, September 01, 2014

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Firwood property back on the market

Published 12:01 pm, Saturday, May 17, 2014

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  • Nothing remains of Firwood, the home that stood at 203 Long Neck Point Road. The pool of water is where the pool once was. Photo: Megan Spicer / Darien News
    Nothing remains of Firwood, the home that stood at 203 Long Neck Point Road. The pool of water is where the pool once was. Photo: Megan Spicer

 

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The property where the 14-bedroom mansion known as Firwood once stood at 203 Long Neck Point Road is back on the market for $14 million after the new owners had a change of heart.

The 4.38-acre property includes 325 feet of Long Island Sound shoreline. The sellers demolished the three-story home in January.

"People's plans change," said Doug Werner, a real estate agent with William Pitt Sotheby's International Realty. "It's a simple as that."

The "nice thing" about the property being on the market is that the next buyer could build "one big nice house," Werner said.

The house, which John D. Crimmins, a philanthropist and contractor, purchased in 1890 from Hugh Collender, a billiards table manufacturer, went on the market with an asking price of $16.75 million in 2010. Crimmins, who paid $32,500, according to his diary, named the home Firwood because of the abundance of fir trees on the property.

After the home was sold in 2013, Halstead Property spokesman Robyn Kammerer said the new owners planned to keep the parcel intact and build a new house once the mansion was torn down.

She and Halstead real estate agent Becky Munro speculated that the house would be moved closer to the water to better enjoy the beauty of its location.

Firwood, known as the Mansion on the Point, was part of a 15-acre tract of land; pieces of the land were sold off over the years.

"If someone wants to build more than one house, that could be a very beautiful development," Werner said. "If someone builds one house, it's going to be an incredible piece of property."

Werner said it's not uncommon for a waterfront home to be torn down after purchase to make way for a new one. He anticipates that the land will generate a fair amount of curiosity.

The property is a "rare offering," Werner said, considering that Darien is almost entirely developed.

"It's a blank canvas," Werner said.

mspicer@bcnnew.com; 203-330-6583; @Meg_DarienNews