DARIEN — Republicans at The Goose on Boston Post Road had good cause for celebration Tuesday night as incumbent First Selectman Jayme Stevenson won a fourth consecutive term.

According to unofficial results from the Registrar of Voters’ office, Stevenson recieved 2,470 votes to beat Democratic candidate Rob Richards and unaffiliated candidate Chris Noe by a comfortable margin. Richards recieved 944 votes and Noe 24 votes.

“A fantastic outcome for Susan, Kip and I. It’s a win for Darien,” Stevenson said, referring to Republicans Susan Marks and Charles “Kip” Koons, both of whom secured spots on the Board of Selectmen.

Stevenson, who will serve her fourth two-year term, claimed victory around 8:45 p.m.

Stevenson, who has been first selectman of Darien since 2011, thanked various individuals who participated in her campaign.

“We ran a really positive campaign for the town of Darien,” the 56-year-old added.

This was the first time Stevenson faced Democratic competition for the town’s top office since 2011.

Just next door to the Republican victory spot, the Democratic candidate and runner-up was with his team at the Bodega Taco Bar. Though the mood was festive and hopeful at 8 p.m., but became more serious as the numbers were tallied.

Richards lost the first selectman race and did not obtain the votes necessary to be on the Board of Selectmen either with Democrats Marc Thorne, an incumbent, and Pamela Sparkman, a newcomer, securing the final spots.

“I wasn’t running against Jayme, I was running for an idea,” he said. “That idea is still prevalent. I invited Pam to run with me, knowing perfectly well she could end on the board, but it was more important to represent the Democratic party, represent what people want. I know that Pam is going to do a great job.”

Unaffiliated candidate for first selectman Chris Noe accrued 24 votes.

“I knew that Stevenson was going to win. The results were very predictable. I didn’t even get 40 votes, I didn’t campaign at all. I didn’t do anything,” said Noe Wednesday morning.

“The first time I ran I did tons of research and spent two and a half months campaigning,” he recalled of the first time he ran for first selectman in 2009.