(skip this header)

Darien News

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

dariennewsonline.com Businesses

« Back to Article

Susan Granger's review of 'Magic in the Moonlight'

Published 2:59 pm, Friday, August 22, 2014
Larger | Smaller
Email This
Font
Page 1 of 1

Confession: I can't remember seeing a movie from writer/director Woody Allen that I didn't like. Some are better than others, like "Blue Jasmine" (2013), but they're all intriguing in their own way. This entrancing, new romantic comedy falls kind of in the middle.

Set in 1928 on the Cote d'Azur in the south of France, the plot revolves around the efforts of Europe's most acclaimed magician to debunk a beautiful, young American from Kalamazoo, Mich., who purports to be a spiritual medium. Responding to a plea from his longtime friend/fellow conjurer Howard Burkan (Simon McBurney), acerbic Stanley Crawford (Colin Firth) arrives at the Riviera villa of gullible Grace Catledge (Jacki Weaver), who is eager to reconnect with her late, Pittsburgh industrialist husband via seances conducted by another house guest, clairvoyant Sophie Baker (Emma Stone), who's traveling with her protective mother (Marcia Gay Harden). In the meantime, Grace's sappy son, Brice (Hamish Linklater), is determined to woo and win Sophie's heart, while Stanley's Aunt Vanessa (Eileen Atkins) in Provence provides wise counsel.

Obviously inspired by George Bernard Shaw's "Pygmalion," Allen envisions cynically debonair Stanley Crawford as misanthropic Henry Higgins, whose dyspeptic demeanor is so arrogant and brash that he alienates everyone with whom he converses. Indeed, as an astute illusionist, Stanley's so determined to slyly unmask Sophie, proving she's a fraud that he doesn't realize he's succumbed to her "magical thinking."

In this role, Firth seems to be channeling the late, great Rex Harrison, a similarity that Allen subtly acknowledges, evoking memories of "My Fair Lady." As for Stone, she plays sweet Sophie's hand so close to the vest that one wonders if, perhaps, she could be the real deal.

Gloriously photographed by Darius Khondji with opulent period costumes by Sonia Grande, burnished sets by production designer Anne Seibel, and an endearing American songbook soundtrack, it's a joy to behold.

On the Granger Movie Gauge of 1 to 10, "Magic in the Moonlight" is a whimsical, ephemeral 8, airily appealing to those who loved "Midnight in Paris" (2011).