A Bethel-based manufacturer will stand among the biggest names in aerospace at the Farnborough International Airshow, taking place next week in England, thanks to a little help from the state.

Connecticut Coining, which employs about 50 people at its Trowbridge Drive facility, will send two representatives to the show to display its products and drum up global business. The Farnborough International Airshow will feature 1,500 exhibitors, including the likes of Boeing and Airbus, from 52 countries. It is expected to attract about 200,000 visitors.

The Bethel company will send CEO Greg Marciano and international sales representative Marlene Gaberel. About 25 to 30 percent of Connecticut Coining’s business comes from the aerospace industry, Gaberel said. The company also serves industries such as defense and health care.

Connecticut Coining is one of eight state companies going to the air show next week. The companies are sponsored by the Connecticut Department of Economic and Community Development, the Connecticut Center for Advanced Technology and the Connecticut Economic Resource Center.

“This show is a great opportunity for participating aerospace companies to market themselves on the global stage,” Catherine Smith, commissioner of the DECD, said. “These smaller companies exhibiting in the Connecticut pavilion have realized many benefits over the years.”

Smith said small companies from Connecticut have earned an estimated $461 million in new sales from the show since 2006.

Joining the Bethel company at the Connecticut pavilion this year will be: Aero Gear, from Windsor; Arcor Laser Services, from Suffield; EDAC Technologies, from Cheshire; New England Airfoil Products, from Farmington; PCX Aerostructures, from Newington; Swift Textile Metalizing, from Broomfield; and Whitcraft Group, from Eastford.

The state agencies cover the vendor costs for the show, but not airfare or accommodations.

“The cost of the show is expensive for small companies so it’s good that Connecticut helps out,” Gaberel said.

Connecticut Coining attended the International Airshow in Paris last year, as well. Gaberel said it will be valuable to reintroduce the company to the contacts made last year.

“It’s best to build relationships face to face,” she said. “You have to establish a relationship, then you can use email or the phone. But you need some face-to-face time. We are in there with some big companies.”

Connecticut Coining did not close any deals as a result of last year’s visit, Gaberel said.

“Not yet, anyway,” she said. “We got some good leads. It doesn’t happen overnight, especially in the aerospace industry. If you don’t do anything, you definitely won’t get any business.”

Gaberel said the company made connections with businesses from Canada, Italy, France, Spain and England last year. The DECD also helps companies obtain grants from the State Trade and Expansion Program, which defray some of the costs of establishing their exporting businesses.

Connecticut Coining was founded in 1963 and manufactures deep-drawn metal parts. It makes housings, shield rings and other parts for aerospace contractors. It operates equipment such as presses, lathes, milling machines and electrical discharge machining.

The writer may be reached at cbosak@hearstmediact.com; 203-731-3338