Photo: Richard Shotwell, AP
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FILE - In this April 3, 2016 file photo, Taylor Swift arrives at the iHeartRadio Music Awards at The Forum in Inglewood, Calif. The man fired from his radio DJ job for groping Swift has been hired by a FILE - In this April 3, 2016 file photo, Taylor Swift arrives at the iHeartRadio Music Awards at The Forum in Inglewood, Calif. The man fired from his radio DJ job for groping Swift has been hired by a Mississippi radio station.Delta Radio CEO David Fuss tells news outlets he believes David Mueller’s side of the story and hired him because he sounds good on air. Swift sued Mueller for a dollar last year, saying he grabbing her bare backside while posing for photo. Mueller, who uses the last name “Jackson” on air, denies the allegation and started co-hosting a show on Monday, Jan. 29, 2018, called “Jackson and Jonbob.”(Photo by Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP, File)
Photo: Thomas Peipert, AP
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FILE - In this Aug. 15, 2017 file photo, former radio host David Mueller, who was accused of groping singer Taylor Swift in 2013, speaks during an interview in Denver. Delta Radio CEO David Fuss tells news FILE - In this Aug. 15, 2017 file photo, former radio host David Mueller, who was accused of groping singer Taylor Swift in 2013, speaks during an interview in Denver. Delta Radio CEO David Fuss tells news outlets he believes Mueller’s side of the story and hired him because he sounds good on air. Swift sued Mueller for a dollar last year, saying he grabbing her bare backside while posing for photo. Mueller, who uses the last name “Jackson” on air, denies the allegation and started co-hosting a show on Monday, Jan. 29, 2018, called “Jackson and Jonbob.”
Photo: Jeff Kandyba, Associated Press
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FILE - In this Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017, file courtroom sketch, pop singer Taylor Swift speaks from the witness stand during a trial, in Denver. A jury on Monday, Aug. 14, was expected to weigh Swift's FILE - In this Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017, file courtroom sketch, pop singer Taylor Swift speaks from the witness stand during a trial, in Denver. A jury on Monday, Aug. 14, was expected to weigh Swift's allegation that a former radio host groped her during a meet-and-greet before a concert and whether the singer's mother and her radio liaison later set out to destroy his career. (Jeff Kandyba via AP, File)
Photo: David Zalubowski
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Austin Swift, left, brother of pop singer Taylor Swift, chats with the singer's publicist, Tree Paine, as they head to the federal courthouse for the civil trial involving the pop singer in a case in federal Austin Swift, left, brother of pop singer Taylor Swift, chats with the singer's publicist, Tree Paine, as they head to the federal courthouse for the civil trial involving the pop singer in a case in federal court Monday, Aug. 14, 2017, in Denver. While the judge has cleared the pop singer, her mother, Andrea, and the singer's radio liaison are still facing allegations that they set out to have a radio host fired for allegedly groping Swift at a photo op before a concert in Denver in 2013. The eight-person jury is expected to decide on that case as well as consider the assault allegation leveled by the singer. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski) ORG XMIT: CODZ104
Photo: David Zalubowski
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A sign in support of pop singer Taylor Swift borrowing a line from one of her songs is spelled out in the windows of an office across the street from the federal courthouse in which the civil trial involving A sign in support of pop singer Taylor Swift borrowing a line from one of her songs is spelled out in the windows of an office across the street from the federal courthouse in which the civil trial involving Swift is going on in federal court Monday, Aug. 14, 2017, in Denver. While the judge has cleared the pop singer, her mother, Andrea, and the singer's radio liaison are still facing allegations that they set out to have a radio host fired for allegedly groping Swift at a photo op before a concert in Denver in 2013. The eight-person jury is expected to decide on that case as well as consider the assault allegation leveled by the singer. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski) ORG XMIT: CODZ106
Photo: David Zalubowski
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Samantha Kosloske of Boulder, Colo., waits in the public line to attend the civil trial involving pop singer Taylor Swift in a case in federal court Monday, Aug. 14, 2017, in Denver. While the judge has cleared Samantha Kosloske of Boulder, Colo., waits in the public line to attend the civil trial involving pop singer Taylor Swift in a case in federal court Monday, Aug. 14, 2017, in Denver. While the judge has cleared the pop singer, her mother, Andrea, and the singer's radio liaison are still facing allegations that they set out to have a radio host fired for allegedly groping Swift at a photo op before a concert in Denver in 2013. The eight-person jury is expected to decide on that case as well as consider the assault allegation leveled by the singer. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski) ORG XMIT: CODZ107
Photo: Jeff Kandyba
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FILE - In this Tuesday, Aug. 8, 2017 file courtroom sketch, pop singer Taylor Swift, front left, confers with her attorney as David Mueller, back left, and the judge look on during a civil trial in federal FILE - In this Tuesday, Aug. 8, 2017 file courtroom sketch, pop singer Taylor Swift, front left, confers with her attorney as David Mueller, back left, and the judge look on during a civil trial in federal court in Denver. A jury on Monday, Aug. 14, was expected to weigh Swift's allegation that a former radio host groped her during a meet-and-greet before a concert and whether the singer's mother and her radio liaison later set out to destroy his career. (Jeff Kandyba via AP, File) ORG XMIT: LA103
Photo: David Zalubowski, Associated Press
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Douglas Baldridge, front center, attorney for pop singer Taylor Swift, emerges from the federal courthouse after a ruling in the civil trial for the singer to determine whether a Denver radio announcer groped Douglas Baldridge, front center, attorney for pop singer Taylor Swift, emerges from the federal courthouse after a ruling in the civil trial for the singer to determine whether a Denver radio announcer groped the singer in a case in federal court late Friday, Aug. 11, 2017, in Denver. A judge on Friday threw out a former radio host's case against Taylor Swift in a trial that delved into their dueling lawsuits over whether he groped her during a backstage meet-and-greet and whether she and her team ruined his career. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Photo: Jeff Kandyba
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FILE - In this Aug. 8, 2017, courtroom sketch, former radio host David Mueller appears in federal court in Denver. A jury on Monday, Aug. 14, was expected to weigh pop singer Taylor Swift's allegation that FILE - In this Aug. 8, 2017, courtroom sketch, former radio host David Mueller appears in federal court in Denver. A jury on Monday, Aug. 14, was expected to weigh pop singer Taylor Swift's allegation that Mueller groped her during a meet-and-greet before a concert and whether the singer's mother and her radio liaison later set out to destroy his career. (Jeff Kandyba via AP, File) ORG XMIT: LA108
Photo: David Zalubowski, STF
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Workers in an office building taped up a message to pop singer Taylor Swift borrowing a title from one of her albums before the start of the civil trial Friday, Aug. 11, 2017, in Denver. Radio station DJ David Workers in an office building taped up a message to pop singer Taylor Swift borrowing a title from one of her albums before the start of the civil trial Friday, Aug. 11, 2017, in Denver. Radio station DJ David Mueller sued Swift after her team reported she was groped by Mueller to his bosses at a country music station. He is seeking up to $3 million, saying the allegation cost him his job and reputation. Swift countersued Mueller, claiming sexual assault. She is seeking a symbolic $1. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Photo: AP
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Austin Swift, front center, brother of of pop singer Taylor Swift, walks with his sister’s publicist, Tree Paine, across a street to attend the morning session of the the fourth day of a civil trial to Austin Swift, front center, brother of of pop singer Taylor Swift, walks with his sister’s publicist, Tree Paine, across a street to attend the morning session of the the fourth day of a civil trial to determine whether a Denver radio host groped the singer in a case in federal court Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017, in Denver. Former DJ David Mueller sued Swift after she said he touched her backside before a concert in Denver in 2013. He’s seeking at least $3 million. Swift countersued for sexual assault and is seeking $1. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Photo: David Zalubowski, STF
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Workers in a high-rise office building across from the federal courthouse put up a sign in support of pop singer Taylor Swift before the morning session of a civil trial to determine whether a Denver radio host Workers in a high-rise office building across from the federal courthouse put up a sign in support of pop singer Taylor Swift before the morning session of a civil trial to determine whether a Denver radio host groped the singer, Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017, in Denver. Former DJ David Mueller sued Swift after she said he touched her backside before a concert in Denver in 2013. He's seeking at least $3 million. Swift countersued for sexual assault and is seeking $1.(AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Photo: AP
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Douglas Baldridge, attorney for pop singer Taylor Swift, leads his team into the morning session of the the fourth day of a civil trial to determine whether a Denver radio host groped the singer in a case in Douglas Baldridge, attorney for pop singer Taylor Swift, leads his team into the morning session of the the fourth day of a civil trial to determine whether a Denver radio host groped the singer in a case in federal court Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017, in Denver. Former DJ David Mueller sued Swift after she said he touched her backside before a concert in Denver in 2013. He’s seeking at least $3 million. Swift countersued for sexual assault and is seeking $1. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Photo: AP
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Tree Paine, right, publicist for pop singer Taylor Swift, leads the singer’s bother, Austin, into the federal courthouse for the morning session of the the fourth day of a civil trial to determine whether a Tree Paine, right, publicist for pop singer Taylor Swift, leads the singer’s bother, Austin, into the federal courthouse for the morning session of the the fourth day of a civil trial to determine whether a Denver radio host groped the singer in a case in federal court Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017, in Denver. Former DJ David Mueller sued Swift after she said he touched her backside before a concert in Denver in 2013. He’s seeking at least $3 million. Swift countersued for sexual assault and is seeking $1. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Photo: David Zalubowski
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Workers put up sign in support of pop singer Taylor Swift in an office building across the street from the federal courthouse in Denver on Tuesday, Aug. 8, 2017, during the jury selection phase in a civil trial Workers put up sign in support of pop singer Taylor Swift in an office building across the street from the federal courthouse in Denver on Tuesday, Aug. 8, 2017, during the jury selection phase in a civil trial to determine whether a radio host groped Swift. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski) ORG XMIT: CODZ101

GREENWOOD, Miss. (AP) — The radio host fired after he lost a groping lawsuit to superstar Taylor Swift says he is "very grateful" for a new gig at a Mississippi station.

David Mueller, 56, told the Greenwood Commonwealth that he had difficulty finding work in a big-city radio market. He started his job Monday in Greenwood, home to about 14,000 people in the rural Mississippi Delta.

"I never wanted to leave radio from the moment I was out on the street with no job and no income," he said.

A federal jury determined Mueller assaulted and battered Swift by grabbing her under her skirt as they posed for a 2013 photo in Denver. Mueller, who goes by "Jackson" on air, still denies that. He began co-hosting the "Jackson and Jonbob" show Monday.

The Washington Post quotes Delta Radio CEO David Fuss saying he believes Mueller's side of the story. Delta Radio is based in Las Vegas and owns nine radio stations.

Mueller's hiring comes as the #MeToo movement draws attention to sexual assault and harassment.

Fuss said Mueller sounds good on air, but allowed that his decision also was "maybe a tiny bit" about publicity.

"He is a very good on-air talent," Fuss said "It's extremely difficult to get people to come to the Mississippi Delta to work. I felt like he needed a break or a second chance."

The Greenwood newspaper reported that Delta Radio has received complaints from Taylor Swift fan groups from as far away as Sweden and Saudi Arabia.

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