In October of 1687, the English Governor, Sir Edmund Andros, who had been appointed by King James, came to Connecticut to take away the charter and the colonists' legal rights.

A large assembly was called to discuss the situation, and the charter was put on a table. Suddenly, someone put out the candles, and in the darkness the charter was taken away.

Captain Wadsworth of Hartford is credited with taking the charter and placing it in a hollow spot in a large oak tree. This tree became known as the Charter Oak.

The Charter Oak was an unusually large white oak tree growing on Wyllys Hyll in Hartford from around the 12th or 13th century until it fell during a storm in 1856.

The oak became a symbol of American independence and is commemorated on the Connecticut State Quarter. In 1935, for Connecticut's tercentennial, it was also depicted on both a commemorative half dollar and a postage stamp.

Information provided by the The Society of Colonial Wars in the State of Connecticut www.colonialwarsct.org/

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1867

The year the Connecticut charter was hidden from the British in an oak tree.

1687

The year the Connecticut charter was hidden from the British in an oak tree.